professorelupin:

fuckyeahprettybooks:

lovejoyjohnlock:

I’m twelve years old again.

Someone help me stop laughing, it hurts.

professorelupin:

fuckyeahprettybooks:

lovejoyjohnlock:

I’m twelve years old again.

Someone help me stop laughing, it hurts.

image

notes-field ha dicho: Where the actual spaghetti is strips of squash? I heard about that, but my attempt was a disaster. How d’ya do that?

Poke holes in the squash. Cook in microwave for 12 minutes. Cut in half the short way. Remove seeds. Use fork to remove squash strings (I dunno what to call them) from inside.

You can also stick it in the oven, but that takes much longer and I was hungry.

Official verdict: Spaghetti squash is better with marinara sauce than with lemon-butter sauce.

I’m just as surprised as you.

A message from schadenfreudessa
I've spent all weekend reading about gender roles in Viking society, and it all makes so much more sense now, maaaaaaaaaaaaan
A reply from ruisenora

I want to hear more.

schadenfreudessa:

I can provide.

Let’s start at the beginning - Traditional views of Viking culture talk about a patriarchal society with a serious honor code that superseded just about everything else. This offered protection to most women, where you would have to pay compensation to her or her family for something even as simple as talking to her when she wasn’t interested. Women also had control of their marriage through divorce, and should vengeance ever be brought against a woman’s family, she and the children were not to be harmed.

Much more recently (like the last ten years or so) scholars and researchers are starting to point out that the Vikings as a traditional patriarchy doesn’t quite jive with the fact that women could not only inherit but become quite successful as landowners, merchants, business partners warriors, and skalds. Women were also involved at every level of the legal process, including being able to bring suit against another. And that’s not even touching on the maiden warrior tradition.

As stated in the Icelandic Gragas, which was a collection of commonwealth laws from the Viking era: a woman who was the sole daughter of a murdered man, if having no other male relatives, was to take over the claim towards the killer as if she were a son. This stayed in effect until she married, at which point she forfeited that right to her husband and his male relatives.

This wasn’t just about getting to be the one to kill her father’s murderer, but could almost be viewed (in a binary gender system) as become a member of the opposite sex. Men could also ‘change gender’ as they grew older - a tragedy for any viking. Most famous in that respect is one of the most manly, powerful figures in Old Norse literature - Egill Skallagrimsson. Despite his masterful prowess and masculinity, he grows old and feeble, described as being innan stokks or withing the domestic sphere.

A traditional patriarchal society doesn’t really account for these very blatant changes back and forth between genders. In fact, a traditional binary view of gender doesn’t handle it so well either.

So, an alternate theory has been developed: Vikings operated on a one-gender system that is very much male all the way. What this means is that unlike the binary gender system where the male and female roles posses two very distinctive and separate sets of traits, the Vikings most likely viewed gender in something of a line or a scale. One end of the line is power or manliness; the other end is powerlessness or not-manly. With this system, a person can move freely along the scale in either direction throughout their life. This was still tied in with their honor system, though, so men were born higher on the manly scale, and it was better to be manly than not-manly.

Another fascinating part of this theory, though, is that it also talks heavily with how our own modern gender roles and perception of gender have influenced the study of Viking culture.

But that’s a whooooole other thing.

If you want more info though, this is a good and short piece.

This has the link to the much longer dissertation mentioned in the short piece.

This one is really good, pretty short, and deals with a specific example.

And this one deals with gender in Old Norse Mythology, plus it talks directly about examples of transgendered Vikings.

Shout out to Jessica for educating me on all things awesome and viking.

Problem
Natalia Kills

marthajefferson:

In A New Hope, Luke’s all-white clothes make a stark contrast with Vader’s all-black ensemble hearkening back to the serial westerns of the 1940s and 1950s, in which the goods wore white and the bads, black. Luke’s outfits continue to emphasize his characterization in this way throughout the trilogy. In The Empire Strikes Back, when he journeys to meet Yoda or to rescue his friends on Bespin, his fatigues are a light gray, showing that he has traveled from the innocent idealism of his youth and has placed himself in peril of straying to the Dark Side. By the time we get to Return of the Jedi, he has adopted an all-black wardrobe, not meaning he has gone over to the Dark Side, but instead, recalling a priest or monk’s garb, and linking him visually to his father, with whose fate he is so deeply connected with.

the “from white to gray to black” evolution

A message from schadenfreudessa
I've spent all weekend reading about gender roles in Viking society, and it all makes so much more sense now, maaaaaaaaaaaaan

I want to hear more.

It’s going to be a late night and early morning.

  • Homework
  • Pack
  • Shower
  • Presentation materials

At least I’ve finished one thing in preparation for this conference.

I spend way too much time thinking about the logistics of the Harry Potter universe.

theacademy:

Yesterday on a Reddit “Ask Me Anything”, Harrison Ford answered the most controversial Star Wars question as if he had never stopped playing the role of Han Solo. 

Hathitrust is the best.